Mapping the World by Heart

Mapping the World by Heart

Support / FAQ

Important updates to the curriculum:

South Sudan (capital Juba) is now an independent country. Click here to view a map.

Customers who purchased before August 15, 2012 can now download the 8.5"x11" maps for "Mapping the U.S.," "Mapping Canada," and "Mapping Mexico." Enjoy!



Considering Purchasing? Read These Common Questions 
 

1. How many map sets will I need?

FableVision Learning offers the maps for Mapping the World by Heart in sets. Each set contains ten 11"x17" double-sided full color regional maps, and seven 11"x17"  black outline world maps (including three blank grids which students can use as they learn to create their own maps). There are also eight 8.5"x11" black outline maps for the appendices. Each student will need at least one map set, although you may want to order more to have additional copies for review or enrichment. You will want to make copies of the blank grids for the black outline world maps, so students can practice on them.

2. I would like more information on the curriculum. What are the lessons like?

The teacher’s guide provides a framework for teaching geography, which can be easily adapted to meet your needs. It is laid out as a “Menu of Lessons” — you can see more on the different parts of the curriculum below. (To view a popular sample lesson from the “Appetizers” section of the curriculum, see question 4.)

  • The "Appetizers" section includes lesson plans (like The Grapefruit Lesson) that help your students understand important geography terms and concepts.
  • The "Entrées" section is the "backbone of the location and place segments of the curriculum." It presents a group of map checklists for students, and the procedure for each lesson is approximately the same. Students use atlases or maps from outside the curriculum to shade and label blank maps. After those initial maps are checked for accuracy, review activities begin (including games suggested in a later section of the binder). It's recommended that you also put together and give quizzes during the Entrée portion of the curriculum – author David Smith recommends marking countries and features with numbers and having students identify them, or asking students to complete a "fill in the blank" type of test.
  • The "Dessert" section provides instructions for having your students create exquisite memory maps of the world – working entirely from memory.
  • The "Seasonings" section includes further activities for review and enrichment. You will find a section on mnemonic devices and some creative games that can be used throughout the year when reviewing different regions. There's also a detailed research project called “The World Experts Lesson,” during which students research and put on a "World Fair." All of these activities provide students with opportunities to collaborate and learn from each other.
  • The "Resources" section includes information on Standard Time, a long list of prompts to encourage further exploration, a list of all the independent states in the world, and a page teaching "hello," "goodbye," and "thank you" in the 13 most common languages.
     

3. How long does the curriculum take? How much time is spent on a given day or week?

Here is a downloadable PDF of the yearlong agenda provided in the curriculum (although it does not feature the “Seasonings” and “Resources” sections listed under the question above). However, David Smith emphasizes that the curriculum can easily be adapted to meet your needs. For example, you may prefer to focus on a specific region or carry out a 10-week mini unit. You can spend more or less time on different parts of the curriculum, or choose to emphasize specific regions. Or, you can follow David's yearlong agenda exactly if you wish.
 

4. Can I see a sample lesson from the curriculum?

To view a popular sample lesson from the “Appetizers” section of the curriculum, download this PDF of The Grapefruit Lesson. This simple yet fun lesson is meant to be completed early in the year, so students have a better idea of the inevitable distortions in different map projections. The Appetizers section has other activities like this. They are designed to familiarize your students with geographical concepts and types of maps (i.e. longitude and latitude, topographical maps, etc.) See question 2 to learn more about the other parts of the curriculum.
 

5. I do not know much about geography. Will I still be able to use this curriculum with my students?

Absolutely! If you have not taught geography before, you will learn a great deal WITH your students as you use this curriculum.

It’s all right if you do not have an existing geography curriculum, although you will need to provide your students with one atlas per student or per group of students who are working together; also, other handy reference tools include a globe, and one or more copies of almanacs (such as The World Almanac, The Time Almanac, etc.). The creator, David Smith, offers recommendations for these on his website: http://www.mapping.com
 

6. I am a homeschooling parent with only one student. Will I still be able to use the curriculum with my student?

Mapping the World by Heart has been incredibly successful with homeschooling families. While it is true that many of the activities in Mapping the World by Heart are designed for classes and groups of students, most can be adapted for one or only a few students. Students may work independently or pair up and work together. Whether you are using the curriculum with one student or a group of students, you will find that it is flexible.  It is also highly recommended that parents and teachers do the program with their children, rather than try to “teach” it. In this way, teachers will understand the issues much more clearly, and can be more helpful; in addition, in a very small homeschool setting, a parent and student who are both working on a region can create review activities and games for each other.
 

7. I own a previous edition of Mapping the World by Heart. What is the difference between previous editions and the new ninth edition?

In the newly revised ninth edition, the framework of the Mapping the World by Heart curriculum is basically the same. The “Menu of Lessons” approach, various "Appetizer" lessons, the structure of the regional worksheet checklists, student handouts, and World Experts Project have not changed substantially. In other words, the way in which the curriculum is structured is basically the same.

However, there are a few key additions and revisions in the ninth edition. The ninth edition includes:

  • Three new appendices written by David J. Smith and illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds: Mapping the U.S. by Heart, Mapping Canada by Heart, and Mapping Mexico by Heart. The appendices include an introductory section, advice on planning the year, tips for teachers, a section on mnemonics, a section encouraging research on states/provinces, and detailed checklists for states/provinces, cities, and geographical features. The appendices help you if you wish to focus on a specific region.
  • Updates and additions to checklists, as well as country and city names.
  • A new double-sided map of Mexico in the map set that comes with the curriculum, featuring Mexico’s statelines. It is intended for use with the Mapping Mexico by Heart Appendix.
  • Minor updates to specific maps in the map set included with the eighth edition of the program.
  • New design for a modern feel and improved readability.

NOTE: The ninth edition also does not include the introductory VHS tape that shipped with previous editions. An updated version of the introductory video, narrated by David Smith and animated by Peter H. Reynolds, is posted online. Watch it here!


 

Customer Support - More Information on Implementing the Curriculum


1. Before anything else, please read this advice directly from creator David Smith himself. This helps give a broad interview for how you might proceed through the curriculum:

The curriculum has several units:

Unit 1: Appetizers or "Getting Oriented" — Learning how to read maps, learning about projections, etc.  The Grapefruit lesson, contour maps, thematic maps, etc.

Unit 2: Entrées — Working with checklists, labeling blank maps, review activities and quizzes. The checklists are as follows:

  1. Selected World Features
  2. US
  3. Canada
  4. Central America
  5. South America
  6. Europe
  7. Eastern Europe and Northern Asia
  8. Africa
  9. South Asia and the middle east
  10. Australia and the Pacific

For each checklist, one week is spent filling in a regional map from atlases, using the checklist handouts in the book, and then exchanging maps and cross-checking.  Then one week is spent creating review activities — sometimes students create the activities for each other, and they LOVE doing this!  The 3rd week is up to you — it can be a review quiz sort of thing, or you can take the week 2 review activities to some other homeschool, etc. (For more information on this part of the curriculum, please see question 2.)

Unit 12: Seasonings — This unit includes further activities for review and enrichment. You will find a section on mnemonic devices and some creative games that can be used throughout the year when reviewing different regions. There's also a detailed (optional) research project called “The World Experts Lesson,” during which students research and put on a "World Fair." All of these activities provide students with opportunities to collaborate and learn from each other.

Unit 13: Dessert Getting ready, learning the outlines, practicing, practicing, practicing. Finally, drawing the final map.

  • My practice is that as students prepare for the final map, then, and only then, do they start to memorize. A constant overlay of memorization throughout the year adds a level of tension to the process that has never worked for me.
  • As they prepare, I encourage students to make up their own Mnemonics, and to help each other by teaching each other how they learned different details.  It's so much fun.  I include it in my "coping questions" every day. 
  • Here are some examples of mnemonics: Italy looks like a boot, what do other countries, oceans, continents look like?  (British Columbia is also a boot, Africa is a woman looking west with a large hairdo, Mexico is a fishing hook.) Whatever students can think of and then explain will be helpful.

Ultimately, the whole point of this curriculum is to get children to learn how they learn — to give them lots of methods for learning hard things, and letting them settle on what works best for them.
 

2. How are the maps in the map set used? Which maps are used with which lessons?

The map set comes with ten double-sided color regional maps. You also receive two copies of each black-line world map (Equirectangular, Mercator, or Robinson projections) — one is a blank grid, the other features continent lines. Hold onto the blank grids until after the Entrées section. (You will photocopy the blank grids for practice purposes later in the curriculum. Please see question 3 for more information.)

Every checklist below corresponds to one of the blank maps in the map:

  • Selected World Features Checklist: Use A black & white outline world map (Equirectangular, Robinson, or Mercator — choose whichever projection you prefer). Do NOT label the blank grids yet — have students label a black and white outline map with the continent outlines on it.
  • US: Use Map 01
  • Canada: Use Map 02
  • Central America: Use Map 03
  • South America: Use Map 04
  • Europe: Use Map 05
  • Eastern Europe and Northern Asia: Use Map 06
  • Africa: Use Map 07
  • South Asia and the middle east: Use Map 08
  • Australia and the Pacific: Use Map 09

Follow these steps when you get to the Entrées section:

Give each student a checklist (i.e. World Features, US, Canada, etc.). Provide them with atlases or globes for reference. Then, have the student use the checklist and reference materials to locate geographical features, cities, etc. and label them on the corresponding map for that checklist. In other words, if a student is using the World Features checklist, he or she would use an atlas or globe to label one of the black and white world outline maps featuring continent outlines (Equirectangular, Mercator, or Robinson — your choice). If your student is using the Africa Checklist, he or she would use an atlas or globe to label the checklist items on the double-sided color Africa regional map.

By labeling their blank maps, students are creating their own handwritten, labeled maps to use for reference during the remainder of the curriculum. By using an atlas to find the places on the checklist and labeling their own maps, children learn to use the atlas, to use an atlas index, to talk to each other about where places are. It's really no more time-consuming than if you gave them a filled-in regional map and said "copy what I've done here," and doing it with a filled-in map denies them the chance to explore the atlas.

For the Entrées section, one week is spent filling in a regional map from atlases, using the checklist handouts in the book, and then exchanging maps with other students (or the teacher) and cross-checking. It can be very helpful to have students collaborate while labeling their maps, too. Next, one week is spent creating review activities — sometimes students create the activities for each other, and they LOVE doing this!  The 3rd week is up to you — it can be something along the lines of a review quiz, or you can take the review activities from week 2 to some other homeschool, etc. Repeat this cycle for each of the checklists.

P.S. Map 10 (Mexico With States) is for use with the Mapping Mexico by Heart Appendix in the back of the binder. If you are currently exploring the main part of the curriculum, put this map aside until you're ready for the appendices.
 

3. How do I teach students to memorize information and draw the maps?

Author David Smith recommends that a teacher not teach how to draw the countries and land masses, but rather give students lots of opportunity to figure it out for themselves. Here are his suggestions:

I suggest doing nothing at all about learning borders and continents and so on during the school year — to impose an overlay of "memorization" on all the regional maps creates a constant sense of panic.

Instead, students teach themselves how to draw the boundaries and borders during the "getting ready" time, in the 3 weeks before they make their final memory maps.  They study and memorize the borders, they create their own mnemonics, and they teach them to each other.

Here's the general order of what I do. . .

Run off lots of black and white blank grids for the world map projection you've decided to use (Equirectangular, Mercator, or Robinson — your choice).

For each student, run off one black and white filled-in outline map (with continent lines) for the world map projection you've decided to use. This filled-in map will be used for checking.

Post one filled-in map on each available window in the classroom, so students can hold their hand-made maps against them to check their work.

Students practice every night — start with the point where 0 degrees of longitude meets zero degrees of latitude, and learn the coast of Africa, each night a little more. Africa generally takes a week. But by then, they are already "learning how to learn..."; some students will be very "right-brained", and try to do connect-the-dots and other literal techniques; others will be very "left-brained", and will focus on shapes and general relationships. Most students find a method somewhere in between that works for them.

In class each day, hand out a blank map and say, "Show me what you learned last night". This will give you a good idea of how students are doing.

Let students ask questions of each other — I call them coping questions. They can ask these out loud, or if they think everybody else knows it and they'll embarrass themselves, then they can drop a card in the classroom "suggestion box." For example, you might get "I know the countries in Central America but not the order they are in. How have others learned this. . .", to which one or more will reply with a mnemonic ("beware of hot gorillas eating nitrates casually, pop" for example); "I can't get the top of Russia to look right. . .", to which somebody might say "It's a triangle, and here's how I make it. . ."; "How did you learn the African countries on the Mediterranean?” to which somebody says "a MALE from Tunisia..."; etc., etc.

Bit by bit, students make sense of it all; during the actual mapmaking, they can review at home each night for the section they plan to do in class the next day. It really does work.
 


 

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